The New Jersey IT Experts


We work hard behind the scenes so annoying technology issues don't slow your business down.

Our mission is to help businesses like yours increase productivity and get more out of the technology you invest in.
We specialize in solutions that safeguard and protect your data and keep operations running smoothly.

Managed IT Services

Intelligent remote monitoring, proactive maintenance, and behind-the-scenes remote support.

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Network Security

Protect your business from threats like malware, viruses, phishing attacks, hackers and other threads.

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Backup & Disaster Recovery

Ensure peace-of-mind in any situation with the most complete data backup solution available.

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Cloud Hosting Solutions

Reduce infrastructure costs, collaborate, and get more done with our unique cloud solutions.

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When you just want IT to work!

There are a lot of computer shops out there that you can call up to fix an issue or install a piece of equipment. They might be able to get you out of crisis mode, but they aren’t looking at the full picture.

At Eclipse Integrated Systems, we understand business. We consult. We provide solutions to solve everyday challenges. We just happen to fix computers as well.

We believe (and have proven) that if you proactively manage technology, run maintenance religiously, and monitor a business network, everyday issues and downtime will be greatly reduced.

This is what makes us different than your typical tech support company. Sure, we can fix computer issues when you have them, but our specialty is preventing them in the first place.

Are you looking for a partner you can trust your IT with? Sign up for a FREE IT Assessment to get started today.

Free IT Whitepaper

Free IT Whitepaper

This whitepaper will evaluate the differences between traditional technical support practices and modern managed IT practices and the pros and cons of both in regards to small and medium-sized businesses.

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What Our Clients Say

  • Amazing!

    Doing business with Eclipse Integrated Systems has been a pleasure.  Marc Buonocore and team are a great bunch to work with!  They really know their stuff when it comes to eliminating annoying computer issues and making technology actually WORK for businesses.

Latest Blogs

Do Browser-Saved Passwords Stay Secure?

In a Word: No
Unfortunately, there are ways that a hacker could access these passwords in each browser that the average user might use.

Google Chrome - When logged in to your Google account, Chrome automatically saves all of your passwords in that account. This means that all a hacker would need to do is gain access to your Google account, and they would be able to see all of your passwords, clear as day.

Mozilla Firefox - Firefox saves a user’s passwords under encryption, with the master password acting as the encryption key. However, this low-level encryption can easily be broken by a brute force attack. Furthermore, these passwords are also accessible by anyone in possession of the device without a login required.

Safari - Similarly to Firefox, all passwords are stored in the browser’s settings, and can be accessed without a login.

Internet Explorer - While IE saves your passwords, it does not show them… unless a relatively easy-to-find tool is utilized. Then your saved passwords are exposed.

Microsoft Edge - Microsoft Edge has had a few problems with security in the past, from the fact that there was a flaw in Edge that allowed hackers to read browser-compatible files (like notepad files, that some people might use to store passwords and credentials in). There have also been problems with some third-party managers in the past, like Edge Password Manager, also neglecting to require password authentication.

This is nothing new. An 11-year-old bug was discovered in the beginning of this year that enabled the theft of website credentials. This bug allowed the saved usernames (which were often just emails) and passwords to also be automatically entered into an invisible hidden form, unbeknownst to the user.

What Can I Do?
The first step you should take is to disable the password manager that is built-in to your browser. The method of doing so varies between them.

Google Chrome - Select the Chrome Menu from the toolbar, and select Settings. Scroll down and select Advanced, and under Passwords and forms, click Manage passwords. Under Auto Sign-in, turn the switch to the off position.

Mozilla Firefox - Find the Firefox Menu in the toolbar, and access Options. Then select Privacy & Security on the left, and under the Forms & Passwords header, deselect Remember logins and passwords for websites.

Safari - In the toolbar, click the Safari Menu. The select Preferences, Autofill, and deselect the following: Using info from my Address Book card, Usernames and passwords, Other forms.

Internet Explorer - Just stop using this one, and use one of the others instead. However, if you insist on using IE (or you have no choice), click into the Internet Explorer Menu found in the toolbar, select Internet Options, Content, and under AutoComplete, select Settings. Once there, deselect Forms and Searches, as well as User names and passwords on forms, clicking OK to finalize your changes.

Microsoft Edge - Select the Edge Menu from the toolbar, and then select Settings. Scroll down to locate View advanced settings. Deactivate Offer to save passwords (under Privacy and services) and deactivate Save from entries (under Manage passwords).

While it may be a pain to remember all of your passwords, there are much more secure options out there. For example, there are services like LastPass that more securely store passwords behind powerful encryption, and while they aren’t infallible, they are far better than what your browser offers.

For more assistance with managing your IT and its security, reach out to Eclipse Integrated Systems at 800-340-0505.

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A Short Look at 2018 in Cybersecurity

To deliver the most effective way of analyzing this year’s hacking attacks, we’ve looked through countless records of hacks in both the public and private sectors. Public hacks are in regard to individuals and municipalities, whereas private hacks are more related to businesses and making records available for sale on the black market.

Private
January

  • 280,000 Medicaid records were exposed when a hacker attacked the Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences. Among the information exposed were patient names, provider names, and full names for affected individuals.

February

  • An unsecured server owned by Bongo International, a company acquired by FedEx, leaked over a hundred-thousand files of FedEx customers. Some of the information leaked included names, drivers’ licenses, national ID cards, voting cards, and utility bills.

March

  • Orbitz, a travel booking site, fell victim to a security vulnerability that exposed 880,000 customers’ payment card information. There was also about two whole years of customer data stolen from their server.
  • French news site L’Express left a database that wasn’t password-protected up for weeks, despite being warned about the security issues regarding this.
  • 134,512 records regarding patients and financial records at the St. Peter’s Surgery and Endoscopy Center in Albany, NY were accessed by hackers.
  • MyFitnessPal, an application used by Under Armor, exposed about 150 million people’s personal information to threats.
  • The WannaCry ransomware claimed another victim in Boeing, which stated that “a few machines” were protected by Microsoft’s 2017 patch.

May

  • Thanks to Twitter storing user passwords in a plaintext file that may have been exposed by internal company staff, the social media titan had to force hundreds of millions of users to change their password.
  • An unauthenticated API found on T-Mobile’s website exposed the personal information of all their customers simply through the use of their cell phone number. The following information was made available: full name, address, account numbers, and tax IDs.
  • A bug found in Atlassian development software titles Jira and Confluence paved the way for hackers to sneak into IT infrastructure of several companies and one U.S. government agency.
  • Rail Europe, a popular server used by American travelers to acquire rail tickets, experienced a three-month data breach that exposed credit card information to hackers.

June

  • A marketing company named Exactis had 340 million records stolen from it, but what’s most shocking about this is that they had accumulated information about nearly every American out there. In response to the breach, there was a class action lawsuit made against the company.
  • Adidas’s website was hacked, resulting in a loss of a few million users’ personal and credit card information.
  • A hacker collective called Magecart initiated a campaign to skim at least 800 e-commerce sites, including Ticketmaster, for sensitive information.

Public
January

  • The Department of Homeland Security was affected by a data breach that exposed information about 247,167 current and former employees.

March

  • Atlanta, Georgia was targeted by a ransomware attack called SamSam. This resulted in a massive problem for their municipal infrastructure. The ransom price given was $51,000, but Atlanta’s leadership refused to meet these demands. Overall, the numbers show that Atlanta has spent more than 10 times that number in the fallout of the attack. Some estimates place the actual cost of this event at nearly $20 million.
  • India’s national ID database, Aadhaar, leaked data of over a billion people. This is one of the largest data breaches in history. A user could pay 500 rupees, equal to about $7, to get the login credentials that allowed anyone to enter a person’s 12-digit code for their personal information. For 300 rupees, or about $4.20, users could also access software that could print an ID card for anyone associated with the database.
  • Cambridge Analytica, a data analytics company that U.S. President Donald Trump used to help his campaign, harvested personal information from over 50 million Facebook users without asking for their permission. Facebook hasn’t called this a data breach, but Cambridge Analytica has since been banned from using the service thanks to this event.

June

  • A hack of a U.S. Government-funded active shooter training center exposed the personal data of thousands of U.S. law enforcement officials. This also exposed which police departments aren’t able to respond to an active shooter situation.

Of course, these are only hacks from 2018. Some of the heavy hitters from 2017 are still causing troubles for their victims. Some of the examples are the Friendfinder hack which exposed 412 million user accounts, as well as the Equifax data breach that resulted in 148 million victims. Other major hacks are likely just around the corner, and according to billionaire investor Warren Buffet, there is a chance that a major cyberattack could strike insurers and cost them tens of billions of dollars. Here are some of the statistics behind this concept:

  • In 2017 over 130 large-scale breaches were reported, a 27 percent increase over 2016.
  • Nearly 1-in-3 organization have experienced some sort of cyberattack in the past.
  • Cryptojacking (stealing cryptocurrency) increased 8,500 percent in 2017.
  • 100,000 organizations were infected with the WannaCry ransomware (400,000 machines).
  • 5.4 billion WannaCry attacks were blocked in 2017.
  • The average monetary cost of a malware attack is $2.4 million.
  • The average time cost of a malware is 50 days.
  • Ransomware cost organization’s over $5 billion in 2017.
  • 20 percent of cyberattacks come from China, 11 percent from the United States, and six percent from the Russian Federation.
  • Phone numbers are the most leaked information.
  • 21 percent of files are completely unprotected.
  • 41 percent of companies have over 1,000 sensitive files left unprotected.
  • Ransomware is growing at 350 percent annually.
  • IoT-based attacks are growing at about 500 percent per year.
  • Ransomware attacks are expected to quadruple by 2020.
  • 7.7 percent of web requests lead to malware.
  • There were 54 percent more types of malware in 2017 than there were in 2016.
  • The cybersecurity market will be worth over $1 trillion by 2025.

Is your company prepared to protect itself in 2018? If not, Eclipse Integrated Systems can help. To learn more, reach out to us at 800-340-0505.

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Intro to Your Tech: Authentication

Authentication vs Authorization
Authentication is basically the act of saying “Yes, I am who I say I am.” While the two are often considered the same, they are slightly different. Authorization is more along the lines of confirming an identity to access information or materials. In fact, the act of authorization cannot actually occur without authentication happening.

How Authentication Works
A user will provide their credentials, which are then cross-referenced with the credentials that the system has stored in a database. If the credentials match, the user is granted authorization to access the system. Depending on the identity associated with these credentials, authorization can be granted at a variety of levels. For example, management will often have more privileges within their network due to the role they play within an organization.

Two-Factor Authentication
In an effort to improve security, many organizations have turned to a method called two-factor authentication, or 2FA for short. 2FA adds an extra layer of security to accounts that would ordinarily only need a username or password. This code is typically delivered to the user via email, application, or a text message whenever they try to access an account protected by 2FA. The code is one-time, so it will always change upon further login attempts. This creates a situation where accounts can only be accessed if the user has access to the other account associated with the 2FA settings defined by the user, securing them from hackers who don’t have access to both. This is the reason why 2FA is so widely used in the business world.

If your business could use a secondary layer of security (hint: it can!), Eclipse Integrated Systems can help. To learn more, reach out to us at 800-340-0505.

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Know someone who would benefit from Eclipse Integrated Systems? Let us know!

Latest News

Eclipse Integrated Systems launches new website!

Eclipse Integrated Systems is proud to announce the launch of our new website at www.eisystems.com. The goal of the new website is to make it easier for our existing clients to submit and manage support requests, and provide more information about our services for prospective clients.

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